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English 0190 (TTh) Writing Project Three – “A Critical Response to a Reading” First Double Spaced Typed Draft Due: Thursday, July 24th (2 ½ to 3 pages in Times New Roman/Arial, 12 point font) Double Spaced Typed Final Draft Due: Tuesday, July 29th (2 ½ to 3 pages in (in folder with additional documents) Times New Roman/Arial, 12 point font) Skills: Thesis and Support, Unity, Coherence, and Acknowledging a Source Formally (in MLA format) Textbook Reference(s): Chapter 6, “Writing to Respond” Topic: For Writing Project Three you will select one of the readings below and write an essay that presents the author’s purpose, along with your own perspective on what the author is trying to prove with their work. You may agree with, disagree with, or agree and disagree with the author’s thesis. For example, if the author argues that failing is the path to success, you may have the thesis: Failing is the path to success for some, but not for others. Your perspective on what the author is arguing is your thesis for Writing Project Three. This project is a thesis and support essay where you will persuade your readers of your point of view using detailed and specific examples from the text and your own experience. You may also make use of other development methods you have learned throughout the semester (close reading, observation, fieldwork, and citing sources). Since you are responding to something you have read, early in your essay (like in the introductory paragraph) you will summarize the reading for your audience and explain any concepts your readers may not understand, but this should not take up a large part of your essay, one brief paragraph (4-6 sentences in length) of summary is enough. (Remember I have read the readings as well.) Then, you will follow this summary with your own view, in the form of a thesis statement (located at the end of your introductory paragraph). Finally, you’ll need to support and prove your thesis with examples based on the text, current knowledge, experience and/or opinion. Another requirement of this project is that you incorporate quotes/paraphrases from the reading that are correctly introduced and that address your thesis. You need to properly cite your quotes/paraphrases in-text, using MLA format. (We will go over this in class.) Remember your thesis response may either support or oppose the author’s perspective; or, you may agree with some points made by the author, but not other points. Your primary objective with Writing Project Three is to establish a thesis and support it with relevant and effective examples from the reading. Readings From Which To Choose (only one): 1. “The Thin Grey Line,” pages 205-207 2. “The Myth of the Latin Woman: ‘I Just Met a Girl Named Maria,’” pages 210-215 3. “The Men We Carry in Our Minds,” pages 227-230 5 Major Components of Writing Project Three: 1. Writing a critical essay in response to one of the readings from the list above. 2. Having an introductory paragraph briefly summarizing the reading you selected. 3. Ending your introductory paragraph with a thesis statement you support and prove throughout your essay with examples from the reading, fieldwork, and/or your own experience. 4. Incorporating quotes/paraphrases from the reading and citing them in-text in MLA format. 5. A Work Cited reference in MLA format at the end of your essay. Grading: A copy of the rubric used for the grading of this essay has been made available to you. If you have any questions or concerns, remember to see your instructor in office hours, and/or make an appointment with the Writing Center as soon as possible. Final Draft Folder: On the cover of your Final Draft Folder you need to clearly write (either in dark pen, marker, or on a label) your name, your class, and the time. In the folder you should include: o A stapled and labeled final draft of your Writing Project o The Peer Review done on your Writing Project, along with the draft given to your reviewer (stapled together) o In-text citations in proper MLA format, as well as a Work/s Cited reference at the end of your essay o An outline of your essay (not the essay you chose to write about), done after your peer review draft is finished (Formal Outline format on page 21) o All other drafts (both handwritten and/or typed), brainstorming, and/or revisions done on your Writing Project Good luck! Writing Project Three Structure Don’t Forget Your Creative Title (which should be capitalized) Paragraph One: Introduction • Should introduce and summarize the reading you chose to look at critically • Should grab your reader’s attention • Should ease your reader into your argument • Should be at least five to six sentences in length • Should end with your one or two sentence thesis statement revealing why you agree with, disagree with, or agree and disagree with the thesis of the chosen reading. (Remember that your thesis should not be your opinion of the reading.) Paragraph Two: First Supporting Paragraph • Should have a topic sentence that supports your thesis statement and establishes the focus for this paragraph • Should have at least one quoted or paraphrased piece of evidence from the chosen reading to support and develop the topic sentence • Should have at least one piece of evidence from fieldwork or personal experience to compare to your quoted/paraphrased evidence above and further support your topic sentence • Be sure to introduce your evidence/sources to avoid plagiarism, cite them in MLA format, and explain how they supports your thesis • Should be at least four to five sentences in length Paragraph Three: Second Supporting Paragraph • Should have a different topic sentence that supports your thesis statement and establishes the focus for this paragraph • Should have at least one quoted or paraphrased piece of evidence from the chosen reading to support and develop the topic sentence • Should have at least one piece of evidence from fieldwork or personal experience to compare to your quoted/paraphrased evidence above and further support your topic sentence • Be sure to introduce your evidence/sources to avoid plagiarism, cite them in MLA format, and explain how they supports your thesis • Should be at least four to five sentences in length Paragraph Four: Third Supporting Paragraph • Should have a different topic sentence that supports your thesis statement and establishes the focus for this paragraph • Should have at least one quoted or paraphrased piece of evidence from the chosen reading to support and develop the topic sentence • Should have at least one piece of evidence from fieldwork or personal experience to compare to your quoted/paraphrased evidence above and further support your topic sentence • Be sure to introduce your evidence/sources to avoid plagiarism, cite them in MLA format, and explain how they supports your thesis • Should be at least four to five sentences in length Paragraph Five: Fourth Supporting Paragraph • Should have a different topic sentence that supports your thesis statement and establishes the focus for this paragraph • Should have at least one quoted or paraphrased piece of evidence from the chosen reading to support and develop the topic sentence • Should have at least one piece of evidence from fieldwork or personal experience to compare to your quoted/paraphrased evidence above and further support your topic sentence • Be sure to introduce your evidence/sources to avoid plagiarism, cite them in MLA format, and explain how they supports your thesis • Should be at least four to five sentences in length Paragraph Six: Conclusion • Should remind your reader of the thesis statement without simply repeating it exactly • Should not simply repeat everything you just said in the essay • Should leave your reader with a thought to ponder (which can be your final thought on your topic) • Should avoid starting with “In conclusion,” “Overall,” or something along those lines • Should be at least four to five sentences in length Your Overall Writing Project • Should have an argumentative thesis statement clearly addressing whether you agree with, disagree with, or agree and disagree with your chosen reading • Should critically explore the chosen reading and provide quoted/paraphrased evidence from it to support your thesis • Should use personal experience and/or fieldwork to help you support your thesis • Should formally acknowledge, in MLA format, all sources used that are not the intellectual property of the student author • Should be organized clearly and logically (see pages 49-54) • Should be unified and coherent (see pages 55-63)

English 0190 (TTh)
Writing Project Three – “A Critical Response to a Reading”

First Double Spaced Typed Draft Due:    Thursday, July 24th (2 ½ to 3 pages in
Times New Roman/Arial, 12 point font)

Double Spaced Typed Final Draft Due:    Tuesday, July 29th (2 ½ to 3 pages in
(in folder with additional documents)    Times New Roman/Arial, 12 point font)

Skills:  Thesis and Support, Unity, Coherence, and Acknowledging a Source Formally (in MLA format)

Textbook Reference(s):  Chapter 6, “Writing to Respond”

Topic:

For Writing Project Three you will select one of the readings below and write an essay that presents the author’s purpose, along with your own perspective on what the author is trying to prove with their work. You may agree with, disagree with, or agree and disagree with the author’s thesis. For example, if the author argues that failing is the path to success, you may have the thesis: Failing is the path to success for some, but not for others.

Your perspective on what the author is arguing is your thesis for Writing Project Three. This project is a thesis and support essay where you will persuade your readers of your point of view using detailed and specific examples from the text and your own experience. You may also make use of other development methods you have learned throughout the semester (close reading, observation, fieldwork, and citing sources).

Since you are responding to something you have read, early in your essay (like in the introductory paragraph) you will summarize the reading for your audience and explain any concepts your readers may not understand, but this should not take up a large part of your essay, one brief paragraph (4-6 sentences in length) of summary is enough. (Remember I have read the readings as well.) Then, you will follow this summary with your own view, in the form of a thesis statement (located at the end of your introductory paragraph). Finally, you’ll need to support and prove your thesis with examples based on the text, current knowledge, experience and/or opinion.

Another requirement of this project is that you incorporate quotes/paraphrases from the reading that are correctly introduced and that address your thesis. You need to properly cite your quotes/paraphrases in-text, using MLA format. (We will go over this in class.)

Remember your thesis response may either support or oppose the author’s perspective; or, you may agree with some points made by the author, but not other points. Your primary objective with Writing Project Three is to establish a thesis and support it with relevant and effective examples from the reading.

Readings From Which To Choose (only one):

1.    “The Thin Grey Line,” pages 205-207
2.    “The Myth of the Latin Woman: ‘I Just Met a Girl Named Maria,’” pages 210-215
3.    “The Men We Carry in Our Minds,” pages 227-230

5 Major Components of Writing Project Three:

1.    Writing a critical essay in response to one of the readings from the list above.

2.    Having an introductory paragraph briefly summarizing the reading you selected.

3.    Ending your introductory paragraph with a thesis statement you support and prove throughout your essay with examples from the reading, fieldwork, and/or your own experience.

4.    Incorporating quotes/paraphrases from the reading and citing them in-text in MLA format.

5.    A Work Cited reference in MLA format at the end of your essay.

Grading:

A copy of the rubric used for the grading of this essay has been made available to you. If you have any questions or concerns, remember to see your instructor in office hours, and/or make an appointment with the Writing Center as soon as possible.

Final Draft Folder:

On the cover of your Final Draft Folder you need to clearly write (either in dark pen, marker, or on a label) your name, your class, and the time.  In the folder you should include:

o    A stapled and labeled final draft of your Writing Project

o    The Peer Review done on your Writing Project, along with the draft given to your reviewer (stapled together)

o    In-text citations in proper MLA format, as well as a Work/s Cited reference at the end of your essay

o    An outline of your essay (not the essay you chose to write about), done after your peer review draft is finished (Formal Outline format on page 21)

o    All other drafts (both handwritten and/or typed), brainstorming, and/or revisions done on your Writing Project

Good luck!

Writing Project Three Structure
Don’t Forget Your Creative Title
(which should be capitalized)

Paragraph One: Introduction
•    Should introduce and summarize the reading you chose to look at critically
•    Should grab your reader’s attention
•    Should ease your reader into your argument
•    Should be at least five to six sentences in length
•    Should end with your one or two sentence thesis statement revealing why you agree with, disagree with, or agree and disagree with the thesis of the chosen reading. (Remember that your thesis should not be your opinion of the reading.)

Paragraph Two: First Supporting Paragraph
•    Should have a topic sentence that supports your thesis statement and establishes the focus for this paragraph
•    Should have at least one quoted or paraphrased piece of evidence from the chosen reading to support and develop the topic sentence
•    Should have at least one piece of evidence from fieldwork or personal experience to compare to your quoted/paraphrased evidence above and further support your topic sentence
•    Be sure to introduce your evidence/sources to avoid plagiarism, cite them in MLA format, and explain how they supports your thesis
•    Should be at least four to five sentences in length

Paragraph Three: Second Supporting Paragraph
•    Should have a different topic sentence that supports your thesis statement and establishes the focus for this paragraph
•    Should have at least one quoted or paraphrased piece of evidence from the chosen reading to support and develop the topic sentence
•    Should have at least one piece of evidence from fieldwork or personal experience to compare to your quoted/paraphrased evidence above and further support your topic sentence
•    Be sure to introduce your evidence/sources to avoid plagiarism, cite them in MLA format, and explain how they supports your thesis
•    Should be at least four to five sentences in length

Paragraph Four: Third Supporting Paragraph
•    Should have a different topic sentence that supports your thesis statement and establishes the focus for this paragraph
•    Should have at least one quoted or paraphrased piece of evidence from the chosen reading to support and develop the topic sentence
•    Should have at least one piece of evidence from fieldwork or personal experience to compare to your quoted/paraphrased evidence above and further support your topic sentence
•    Be sure to introduce your evidence/sources to avoid plagiarism, cite them in MLA format, and explain how they supports your thesis
•    Should be at least four to five sentences in length

Paragraph Five: Fourth Supporting Paragraph
•    Should have a different topic sentence that supports your thesis statement and establishes the focus for this paragraph
•    Should have at least one quoted or paraphrased piece of evidence from the chosen reading to support and develop the topic sentence
•    Should have at least one piece of evidence from fieldwork or personal experience to compare to your quoted/paraphrased evidence above and further support your topic sentence
•    Be sure to introduce your evidence/sources to avoid plagiarism, cite them in MLA format, and explain how they supports your thesis
•    Should be at least four to five sentences in length

Paragraph Six: Conclusion
•    Should remind your reader of the thesis statement without simply repeating it exactly
•    Should not simply repeat everything you just said in the essay
•    Should leave your reader with a thought to ponder (which can be your final thought on your topic)
•    Should avoid starting with “In conclusion,” “Overall,” or something along those lines
•    Should be at least four to five sentences in length

Your Overall Writing Project
•    Should have an argumentative thesis statement clearly addressing whether you agree with, disagree with, or agree and disagree with your chosen reading
•    Should critically explore the chosen reading and provide quoted/paraphrased evidence from it to support your thesis
•    Should use personal experience and/or fieldwork to help you support your thesis
•    Should formally acknowledge, in MLA format, all sources used that are not the intellectual property of the student author
•    Should be organized clearly and logically (see pages 49-54)
•    Should be unified and coherent (see pages 55-63)

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