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Presentation The Assignment: Rewrite one of the two reports into a verbal and visual presentation. You must use visuals of some kind, preferable images, short video clips, and presentation software (e.g. Prezi or PowerPoint). Requirements: 4-6 minutes Include visuals. These do not have to be in the form of a PowerPoint or the like, but they do need to add a clarifying element—it should do, say, or clarify something in a more powerful way than you are able to. Think about audience. You are presenting to intelligent peers who may not be the same major as you. They’re also burned out and tired because it’s the end of the quarter. Find a balance between educating and engaging them while still remaining professional. Explain the main point(s) of your report: what are the overarching goals, and what are the take-away points? Explain the purpose of your report Explain why you’re interested in it, or what connection you have to this topic. Explain the report in a way that we can understand and hopefully relate to. Use more visuals than text if you use presentation software (do not just read slides to us; we can read and that’s boring). Other Details You do not have to turn in your notes or written speech for this presentation, but I highly recommend you do write out what you will say. You may use note cards Presentation Rubric 1) Clear explanation of why you’re interested, background information, and who the intended audience is. Your explanation should be clear and concise with unfamiliar definitions explained and a clear connection to who the audience is and why. Think about this: What do we need to know to understand your report? Give us context. /10 2) Clear explanation the main point(s) or purpose, and the report itself. Find a balance between education and engagement. Your explanation should be clear and concise, taking your audience (our 104a class) into consideration. Speak to us as intelligent peers, but not as all knowing about your topic. Respectfully teach us about your topic’s arguments or main supporting points in an engaging way. Don’t just read the report; know what you’re going to say and casually, yet professionally explain. Think about this: If you were going to explain this topic to a peer, what would you say to make it both clear and interesting? /20 3) Clear explanation of why this topic is important outside of this classroom. This is your analysis. This is the “so what?” question. Explain to whom and/or to what this topic matters. It may not directly relate to each one of us, but you’ll still want to get us to understand why this is an important or valuable topic for someone or something. “Because I like it” is a wrong answer. /10 4) Clear and helpful use of visuals. You must do the majority (2/3) of the speaking; do not let videos do the speaking for you. Visuals should add a clarifying element. This is a way for you to engage us, make us interested in your topic, and/or to help us better understand your topic. Think about appealing to our sense of emotion (maybe with a video clip) and/or our sense of factual logic (maybe with a chart, graph, or statistics). Think about this: What needs further explanation, or what could be shown visually better than it could be said verbally? /5 5) Strength of public speaking skills. Do not just read from your draft, notes, or the PowerPoint screen. Know what you’re going to say—and when you’re going to say it—ahead of time. Note cards or bullet points on notebook paper is fine. It should be clear that you practiced, thought about how to engage your audience, and that you know about how long your presentation will last. Find a balance between being too formal and too informal. Use professional language, but don’t be robotic, pretentious, or monotone. /5 Overall Grade: /50

Presentation

 

The Assignment:

Rewrite one of the two reports into a verbal and visual presentation. You must use visuals of some kind, preferable images, short video clips, and presentation software (e.g. Prezi or PowerPoint).

 

Requirements:

  • 4-6 minutes
  • Include visuals. These do not have to be in the form of a PowerPoint or the like, but they do need to add a clarifying element—it should do, say, or clarify something in a more powerful way than you are able to.
  • Think about audience. You are presenting to intelligent peers who may not be the same major as you. They’re also burned out and tired because it’s the end of the quarter. Find a balance between educating and engaging them while still remaining professional.
  • Explain the main point(s) of your report: what are the overarching goals, and what are the take-away points?
  • Explain the purpose of your report
  • Explain why you’re interested in it, or what connection you have to this topic.
  • Explain the report in a way that we can understand and hopefully relate to.
  • Use more visuals than text if you use presentation software (do not just read slides to us; we can read and that’s boring).

 

Other Details

  • You do not have to turn in your notes or written speech for this presentation, but I highly recommend you do write out what you will say.
  • You may use note cards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presentation Rubric

 

1) Clear explanation of why you’re interested, background information, and who the intended audience is.

 

Your explanation should be clear and concise with unfamiliar definitions explained and a clear connection to who the audience is and why. Think about this: What do we need to know to understand your report? Give us context.

 

/10

 

2) Clear explanation the main point(s) or purpose, and the report itself. Find a balance between education and engagement.

 

Your explanation should be clear and concise, taking your audience (our 104a class) into consideration. Speak to us as intelligent peers, but not as all knowing about your topic. Respectfully teach us about your topic’s arguments or main supporting points in an engaging way. Don’t just read the report; know what you’re going to say and casually, yet professionally explain. Think about this: If you were going to explain this topic to a peer, what would you say to make it both clear and interesting?

 

/20

 

3) Clearexplanation of why this topic is important outside of this classroom.

 

This is your analysis. This is the “so what?” question. Explain to whom and/or to what this topic matters. It may not directly relate to each one of us, but you’ll still want to get us to understand why this is an important or valuable topic for someone or something. “Because I like it” is a wrong answer.

 

/10

 

4) Clear and helpful use of visuals. You must do the majority (2/3) of the speaking; do not let videos do the speaking for you. Visuals should add a clarifying element.

 

This is a way for you to engage us, make us interested in your topic, and/or to help us better understand your topic. Think about appealing to our sense of emotion (maybe with a video clip) and/or our sense of factual logic (maybe with a chart, graph, or statistics). Think about this: What needs further explanation, or what could be shown visually better than it could be said verbally?

 

/5

 

5) Strength of public speaking skills. Do not just readfrom your draft, notes, or the PowerPoint screen. Know what you’re going to say—and when you’re going to say it—ahead of time. Note cards or bullet points on notebook paper is fine. It should be clear that you practiced, thought about how to engage your audience, and that you know about how long your presentation will last.Find a balance between being too formal and too informal. Use professional language, but don’t be robotic, pretentious, or monotone.

 

/5

Overall Grade: /50

Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now