Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now

Meeting Time: Description: This is a graduate level course in child and adolescent psychopathology, assessment and treatment. The course will cover DSM-V child and adolescent disorders. The course will review prevalence, etiology, diagnostic criteria, co-morbidity, sampling patterns, assessment and treatment strategies, and outcomes across major childhood and adolescent emotional and behavioral disorders. Teaching methods will include lecture, reading, class discussion, class activities, videos, case reviews and peer presentations. Objectives: After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: • Demonstrate competency in multi-modal, multi-method assessment of a variety of childhood disorders; • Demonstrate an understanding of the DSM-5 taxonomy of child and adolescent behavioral disorders; • Critically review the empirical literature as it pertains to the strengths and weaknesses of the DSM-5 taxonomy of child and adolescent behavioral disorders; • Demonstrate an understanding of how the literature reviewed in the course may be applied in clinical venues; • Communicate an awareness of how co-morbidity, family dynamics, gender, and culture frequently complicate clinical presentation and significantly influence outcome; • Demonstrate an understanding of assessment instruments and strategies utilized in diagnosing and developing a treatment plan for child and adolescent emotional and behavioral disorders; • Demonstrate an understanding of empirically supported treatments for child and adolescent emotionaland behavioral disorders. Textbooks: There will be one required textbook and several supplemental texts and articles: Required: Mash, E. & Barkley, R. (Ed.) (2006).Treatment of Childhood Disorders (3rd Ed.). New York: Guilford Press. Chorpita, B. F., Daleiden, E. L., Ebesutani, C., Young, J., Becker, K. D., Nakamura, B. J., Phillips, L., Ward, A. Lynch, R., Trent, L., Smith, R. L., Okamura, K., &Starace, N. (2011). Evidence-based treatment for children and adolescents: An updated review of indicators of efficacy and effectiveness. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 18(2), 154-172. Supplemental: American Psychiatric Association (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of the mental disorders- 5th Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, Inc. (DSM-5) (MBTx) Mash, E. & Barkley, R. (Ed.) (2003). Child psychopathology (2nd Ed.). New York: Guilford Press. (MB) Mash, E. &Terdal, L. (2010). Assessment of childhood disorders (4th Ed.). New York: Guilford Press.(MT) Articles: AdditionalReadings: 1. ADHD – Fabiano, G. A., Pelham Jr., W. E., Coles, E. K., Gnagy, E. M., Chronis-Tuscano, A., & O’Connor, B. C. (2009). A meta-analysis of behavioral treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Clinical Psychology Review, 29(2), 129-140. 1a. Rajendran, K., Rindskopf, D., O’neill, S., Marks, D. J., Nomura, Y., &Halperin, J. M. (2013). Neuropsychological functioning and severity of ADHD in early childhood: A four-year cross-lagged study. Journal of AbnormalPsychology, 122 (4), 1179-1188. 2. CD – Burt, S. A. (2009). Rethinking environmental contributions to child and adolescent psychopathology: A meta-analysis of shared environmental influences. Psychological Bulletin, 135(4), 608-637. 3. DEPR – McLeod, B. D., Weisz, J. R., & Wood, J. J. (2007). Examining the association between parenting and childhood depression: A meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 27(8), 986-1003. 3a. DMDD – http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/articles/dsm-5-approves-new-fad-diagnosis-child-psychiatry-antipsychotic-use-likely-rise 4. ANX – Van der Bruggen, C. O., Stams, G. J., &Bögels, S. M. (2008). Research review: The relation between child and parent anxiety and parental control: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49(12), 1257-1269. 4a. ANX – McLeod, B.D., Wook, J. J., &Weisz, J. R. (2007). Examining the association between parenting and childhood anxiety: A meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 27, 155 – 172. 5. PTSD -Brown, E. J., Pearlman, M. Y., & Goodman, R. F. (2004). Facing fears and sadness: Cognitive- behavioral therapy for childhood traumatic grief. Harvard Review of Psychiatry, 12(4), 187-198. 6. SA – Waldron, H. B. & Turner, C. W. (2008) Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for adolescent substance abuse. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 37(1), 238-261. 7. PDD – Helt, M., Kelley, E., Kinsbourne, M., Boorstein, H., Fein, D., Herbert, M., & Pandey, J. (2008). Can children with autism recover? If so, how? Neuropsychology Review, 18(4), 339-366. 8. SCZ – Asarnow, J. R., Tompson, M. C., & McGrath, E. P. (2004). Annotation: Childhood-onset schizophrenia: clinical and treatment issues. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45(2), 180-194. 9. ED – Grabe, S., Ward, L. M., and Hyde, J. S. (2008). The role of the media in body image concerns among women: A meta-analysis of experimental and correlational studies. Psychological Bulletin, 134(3), 460-476. 9b. ED -Thomas, J. J., Vartanian, L. R., & Brownell, K. D. (2009). The relationship between Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (ED-NOS) and officially recognized eating disorders: Meta-analysis and implications for DSM. Psychological Bulletin, 135(3), 407–433. 10. NP – Frith, C. D. (2006). The value of brain imaging in the study of development and its disorders. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 47(10), 979-982.  Course Requirements and Grading Policy: 1. Class participation and attendance (25% of grade): This is a discussion-oriented class. Thus, the quality of the experience depends heavily upon each of you participating. Because each of your contributions are important, any unexcused absences will result in a significant lowering of this grade, as will two or more excused absences. Before each lecture, I will put a downloadable file of the pptslides on the course BB page. 2. Examinations (50% of grade): There will be a midterm and a final, each of which will count towards 25% of the final grade. The mid-term exam will be administered in-class in essay format. Content for the mid-term will be drawn from lectures, readings, and classroom discussions. The final exam will involve an in-class evaluation report write-up in which students will be given test data, behavior checklist data, behavioral observation notes, and interview data and will write an evaluation report based upon the data provided (laptops or tablets will be required) during the final exam period in class. Completed reports will be submitted to a turnitin link on the BB page prior to the end of the examination. 3. Paper/Presentation (25% of grade): You are to prepare both a paperand a presentation on a childhood disorder. The paper should be formatted in APA style with references and should be submitted via BB (turnitin link) by midnight (11:59 pm) of the last night of class (April 28th). Topics should focus on childhood or adolescent psychopathology andmust be approved by me by March 1st. Youmust have your outline approved by me to make sure you are examininga disorder or some aspect of the disorder from a novel viewpoint (e.g., “The evolving conceptualization of ADHD: Implications for assessment and treatment”), an assessment instrument or conceptual aspect of assessment (e.g., “The use of analog observation in assessing childhood disorders”), or a treatment (e.g., “Providing hospitalized children with education under IDEA”).The paper should be no less than 20pages (and no longer than 30), double-spaced (including references). The presentation should be no longer than 20 minutes to allow for 5 minutes of Q & A (total time allotted per person will be 25 minutes, including Q & A).An outline for the paper must be submitted by week 10 and approved.(see course schedule) The outline should be more than just skeletal. There should be main points and sub-points for each main point. An initial reference list should be included in the outline submission. Some possible topics (this is by no means a comprehensive list): Childhood Schizophrenia, the Tripartite Model of Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents, Reactive Attachment Disorder, Similarities and Differences in Childhood and Adolescent Depression Across Gender, Non-Verbal Social Learning Disability, Race and Racism in Child Psychopathology, Treating Learning Disabilities, Brain Models of ADHD, Central Auditory Processing Disorder, Elimination Disorders, Interaction Between Parenting Strategies and Childhood Psychopathology, Gender Dysphoria, Tourette’s Disorder, Substance Abuse in Adolescents, The Sensitivity of Continuous Performance Tests, etc. While papers are to be submitted via the turnitin link on the course BB page by midnight on the last week of class (4/28), they can be submitted prior to that date/time. You will also be required to submit scans of your journal articles to a link in the assignments section of the course BB page (NOT turnitin). The Powerpoint presentations should be submitted to BB via the link I post in the assignments section of our class BB page. They are due at class time on the first night of presentations, April 21st, at 5:15 p.m. Papers/Presentations will be evaluated using the following scoring rubric: -Coverage – depth and breadth of information about topic (25%) -Critical thinking – critical examination of the literature reviewed (25%) -Quality – quality of the writing/presentation – parsimony is a plus (25%) -References – correct formatting and quality (15%) -Creativity – topic is interesting, important, and original (10%) Grading: Grades are based on a combination of exams (100 points each), the paper/presentation (100 points) and participation (100 points), as noted, below. SOURCE: POINTS EXAMS: 200 PAPER/PRESENTATION: 100 CLASS PARTICIPATION: 100 400 Final course grades will be computed using the following cut-off points in total-percentage scores: A = 93% and up A- = 90-92% B+ = 87-89% B = 83-86% B- = 80-82% C = 73-76% C+ = 77-79 Final averages of over .5 of a point will be rounded to the next higher grade point. For example, a final average of 79.5 would be rounded to a grade of 80. However, a grade of 79.4 would remain a grade of 79. Final grades are not open to negotiation or extra points for other assignments. Changes will be made only if a clerical error is found. Late Work: Assignments are due at the beginning of the class. Assignments that are submitted after the deadline will be accepted, but only if submitted within 3 days of the original due date. All late assignments so accepted will receive a 25% reduction late penalty for every 24 hours past the due date. HPU Academic Honesty Policy: It is assumed that all students are familiar with the University policies regarding academic honesty. Plagiarism, cheating on examinations or assignments, and taking credit for work that is not your own are serious infractions that will result, at minimum, in a “0” for the involved assignment, and at maximum, in a letter grade of “F” for the course. If you ever have questions or concerns about plagiarism or academic dishonesty, please see me during my office hours. I will be happy to assist you in following the standards of ethical academic conduct. Click on the link below for HPU’s academic honesty policy. http://www.hpu.edu/OAA/OAA_DOCUMENTS.html ADA Accommodations: Under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Tile III (Public Accommodations) and Title V (Employment) and the Hawaii Fair Employment Practice Law, Hawaii Pacific University does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. Hawaii Pacific University will make reasonable accommodations in its policies, practices, and procedures in order to: (1) allow students with disabilities to benefit from the services and facilities offered by the University, and (2) employ otherwise qualified individuals with disabilities who are able to do the essential tasks of the specific jobs. HPU will accommodate known disabilities, unless to do so would impose an undue hardship. This is interpreted to mean significant difficulty (fundamentally altering the nature of the services and facilities provided by the University) or expense. HPU has a designated ADA Coordinator/Academic Advisor, Danielle DeMello, who is located at the downtown campus, 1164 Bishop St. (UB), Suite 123. She can be reached by calling (808) 566-2406 or at ddemello@hpu.edu. If you are a student with special needs, as addressed by the Americans with Disabilities Act, and need any course materials provided in an alternative format, please contact Danielle DeMello and notify your instructor immediately. If you are unable to reach Danielle DeMello, you can contact the ADA and Academic Advising Assistant at the same address and phone number. Reasonable efforts will be made to accommodate your special needs. Additional Expectations: Students are expected to attend every class and turn work in on time. Students are expected to inform the instructor, in advance, if s/he will not be able to attend class for any reason, in which case students will be expected to make up any work/activities associated with the missed class. As this is a graduate course, students are expected to participate as professionals in the field, providing opinions and asking questions, coming to class fully prepared, and staying for the duration of the class (unless prior arrangements have been made). Class participation is worth ¼ of the overall grade and is therefore of critical importance for this class. Additional Considerations: Students having personal difficulties and wanting independent support/counsel are encouraged to contact Dr. Kevin Bowman of the HPU Counseling Center. The Counseling and Behavioral Health Center provides free and confidential counseling services to HPU students. For more information or to make an appointment, click on this link – http://www.hpu.edu/Counseling_Behavioral_Health/ – or call 687-7076. Course Outline:The following is a TENTATIVE outline of the classes and topics.It is highly unlikely that we will stick to this schedule precisely, but I will do my best. Week Topic Required Readings 1/20-1 No Class – MLKJr. Day Chorpita et. al, 2011 1/27-2 Overview; diagnosing children; DSM-5 MB – Ch. 1; DSM-5 Section 1 2/3-3 ADHD MB – Ch. 2; DSM-5 2/10-4 Conduct Problems MB – Ch. 3; DSM-5 2/17-5 Fears and Anxieties MB – Ch. 4; DSM-5 2/24-6 Childhood Depression MB – Ch. 5; DSM-5 3/3-7 Intellectual Disability; Learning Disability MB – Ch. 6 & 8; DSM-5 3/10-8* Mid Term Exam 3/17-9 Autism Spectrum Disorder MB – Ch. 7; DSM-5 3/24 No Class – Spring Break — 3/31-10+ Child Abuse and Neglect MB – Ch. 9 & 10 4/7-11 Substance Use MB – Ch. 11; DSM-5 4/14-12 Eating Disorders MB – Ch. 12; DSM-5 4/21-13 Catching up – Student Presentations 4/28-14 : ) Student Presentations – Final Review 5/5-15 Final Exam Dates to remember: March 1 – Paper topic approval *March 10 – Mid term examination +March 31 – Outline for paper/presentation due, in class or via email. : ) April 28 – Final paper due before midnight

Meeting Time:

Description:  This is a graduate level course in child and adolescent psychopathology, assessment and treatment. The course will cover DSM-V child and adolescent disorders. The course will review prevalence, etiology, diagnostic criteria, co-morbidity, sampling patterns, assessment and treatment strategies, and outcomes across major childhood and adolescent emotional and behavioral disorders. Teaching methods will include lecture, reading, class discussion, class activities, videos, case reviews and peer presentations.

 

ObjectivesAfter successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

• Demonstrate competency in multi-modal, multi-method assessment of a variety of childhood disorders;

• Demonstrate an understanding of the DSM-5 taxonomy of child and adolescent behavioral disorders;

• Critically review the empirical literature as it pertains to the strengths and weaknesses of the DSM-5

taxonomy of child and adolescent behavioral disorders;

• Demonstrate an understanding of how the literature reviewed in the course may be applied in clinical

venues;

• Communicate an awareness of how co-morbidity, family dynamics, gender, and culture frequently

complicate clinical presentation and significantly influence outcome;

• Demonstrate an understanding of assessment instruments and strategies utilized in diagnosing and

developing a treatment plan for child and adolescent emotional and behavioral disorders;

• Demonstrate an understanding of empirically supported treatments for child and adolescent emotionaland

behavioral disorders.

 

Textbooks:  There will be one required textbook and several supplemental texts and articles:

 

Required:

Mash, E. & Barkley, R. (Ed.) (2006).Treatment of Childhood Disorders (3rd Ed.). New York: Guilford Press.

 

Chorpita, B. F., Daleiden, E. L., Ebesutani, C., Young, J., Becker, K. D., Nakamura, B. J., Phillips, L., Ward, A. Lynch, R., Trent, L., Smith, R. L., Okamura, K., &Starace, N. (2011).  Evidence-based treatment for children and adolescents: An updated review of indicators of efficacy and effectiveness. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 18(2), 154-172.

 

Supplemental:

American Psychiatric Association (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of the mental disorders- 5th

     Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, Inc. (DSM-5)

(MBTx)

Mash, E. & Barkley, R. (Ed.) (2003). Child psychopathology (2nd Ed.). New York: Guilford Press. (MB)

Mash, E. &Terdal, L. (2010). Assessment of childhood disorders (4th Ed.).  New York: Guilford Press.(MT)

 

 

Articles:

 

AdditionalReadings:

1. ADHD – Fabiano, G. A., Pelham Jr., W. E., Coles, E. K., Gnagy, E. M., Chronis-Tuscano, A., & O’Connor,

B. C. (2009).  A meta-analysis of behavioral treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Clinical

Psychology Review, 29(2), 129-140.

 

1a. Rajendran, K., Rindskopf, D., O’neill, S., Marks, D. J., Nomura, Y., &Halperin, J. M. (2013).

     Neuropsychological functioning and severity of ADHD in early childhood: A four-year cross-lagged study.

     Journal of AbnormalPsychology, 122 (4), 1179-1188.

 

2. CD – Burt, S. A. (2009).  Rethinking environmental contributions to child and adolescent psychopathology:

A meta​-​analysis of shared environmental influences. Psychological Bulletin, 135(4), 608-637.

 

3. DEPR –  McLeod, B. D., Weisz, J. R., & Wood, J. J. (2007). Examining the association between parenting

and childhood depression: A meta​-​analysis.  Clinical Psychology Review, 27(8), 986-1003.

 

3a. DMDD – http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/articles/dsm-5-approves-new-fad-diagnosis-child-psychiatry-antipsychotic-use-likely-rise

 

4. ANX – Van der Bruggen, C. O., Stams, G. J., &Bögels, S. M. (2008).  Research review: The relation

between child and parent anxiety and parental control: A meta​-​analytic review.  Journal of Child

     Psychology and Psychiatry, 49(12), 1257-1269.

 

4a. ANX – McLeod, B.D., Wook, J. J., &Weisz, J. R. (2007).  Examining the association between parenting

and childhood anxiety: A meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 27, 155 – 172.

 

5. PTSD -Brown, E. J., Pearlman, M. Y., & Goodman, R. F. (2004).  Facing fears and sadness: Cognitive-

behavioral therapy for childhood traumatic grief.  Harvard Review of Psychiatry, 12(4), 187-198.

 

6. SA – Waldron, H. B. & Turner, C. W. (2008) Evidence​-​based psychosocial treatments for adolescent substance abuse.  Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 37(1), 238-261.

 

7. PDD – Helt, M., Kelley, E., Kinsbourne, M., Boorstein, H., Fein, D., Herbert, M., & Pandey, J. (2008).  Can

children with autism recover? If so, how? Neuropsychology Review, 18(4), 339-366.

 

8. SCZ – Asarnow, J. R., Tompson, M. C., & McGrath, E. P. (2004).  Annotation: Childhood-onset

schizophrenia: clinical and treatment issues.  Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45(2), 180-194.

 

9. ED –  Grabe, S., Ward, L. M., and Hyde, J. S. (2008). The role of the media in body image concerns among

women: A meta-analysis of experimental and correlational studies. Psychological Bulletin, 134(3),

460-476.

 

9b. ED -Thomas, J. J., Vartanian, L. R., & Brownell, K. D. (2009). The relationship between Eating Disorder

Not Otherwise Specified (ED-NOS) and officially recognized eating disorders: Meta-analysis and

implications for DSM.  Psychological Bulletin, 135(3), 407–433.

 

10. NP – Frith, C. D. (2006).  The value of brain imaging in the study of development and its disorders.

Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 47(10), 979-982.

Course Requirements and Grading Policy:

 

1. Class participation and attendance (25% of grade): This is a discussion-oriented class. Thus, the quality of the experience depends heavily upon each of you participating. Because each of your contributions are important, any unexcused absences will result in a significant lowering of this grade, as will two or more excused absences. Before each lecture, I will put a downloadable file of the pptslides on the course BB page.

2. Examinations (50% of grade): There will be a midterm and a final, each of which will count towards 25% of the final grade. The mid-term exam will be administered in-class in essay format. Content for the mid-term will be drawn from lectures, readings, and classroom discussions. The final exam will involve an in-class evaluation report write-up in which students will be given test data, behavior checklist data, behavioral observation notes, and interview data and will write an evaluation report based upon the data provided (laptops or tablets will be required) during the final exam period in class.  Completed reports will be submitted to a turnitin link on the BB page prior to the end of the examination.

3. Paper/Presentation (25% of grade):  You are to prepare both a paperand a presentation on a childhood disorder.  The paper should be formatted in APA style with references and should be submitted via BB (turnitin link) by midnight (11:59 pm) of the last night of class (April 28th). Topics should focus on childhood or adolescent psychopathology andmust be approved by me by March 1st. Youmust have your outline approved by me to make sure you are examininga disorder or some aspect of the disorder from a novel viewpoint (e.g., “The evolving conceptualization of ADHD: Implications for assessment and treatment”), an assessment instrument or conceptual aspect of assessment (e.g., “The use of analog observation in assessing childhood disorders”), or a treatment (e.g., “Providing hospitalized children with education under IDEA”).The paper should be no less than 20pages (and no longer than 30), double-spaced (including references).  The presentation should be no longer than 20 minutes to allow for 5 minutes of Q & A (total time allotted per person will be 25 minutes, including Q & A).An outline for the paper must be submitted by week 10 and approved.(see course schedule)  The outline should be more than just skeletal.  There should be main points and sub-points for each main point.  An initial reference list should be included in the outline submission.

 

Some possible topics (this is by no means a comprehensive list):

Childhood Schizophrenia, the Tripartite Model of Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adolescents, Reactive Attachment Disorder, Similarities and Differences in Childhood and Adolescent Depression Across Gender, Non-Verbal Social Learning Disability, Race and Racism in Child Psychopathology, Treating Learning Disabilities, Brain Models of ADHD, Central Auditory Processing Disorder, Elimination Disorders, Interaction Between Parenting Strategies and Childhood Psychopathology, Gender Dysphoria, Tourette’s Disorder, Substance Abuse in Adolescents, The Sensitivity of Continuous Performance Tests, etc.

 

While papers are to be submitted via the turnitin link on the course BB page by midnight on the last week of class (4/28), they can be submitted prior to that date/time.  You will also be required to submit scans of your journal articles to a link in the assignments section of the course BB page (NOT turnitin).

 

The Powerpoint presentations should be submitted to BB via the link I post in the assignments section of our class BB page.  They are due at class time on the first night of presentations, April 21st, at 5:15 p.m.

 

Papers/Presentations will be evaluated using the following scoring rubric:

-Coverage – depth and breadth of information about topic (25%)

-Critical thinking – critical examination of the literature reviewed (25%)

-Quality – quality of the writing/presentation – parsimony is a plus (25%)

-References – correct formatting and quality (15%)

-Creativity – topic is interesting, important, and original (10%)

 

Grading:  Grades are based on a combination of exams (100 points each), the paper/presentation (100 points) and participation (100 points), as noted, below.

SOURCE:                                                    POINTS

EXAMS:                                                         200

PAPER/PRESENTATION:                             100

CLASS PARTICIPATION:                          100

400

 

Final course grades will be computed using the following cut-off points in total-percentage scores:

A = 93% and up

A- = 90-92%

B+ = 87-89%

B = 83-86%

B- = 80-82%

C = 73-76%

C+ = 77-79

 

 

Final averages of over .5 of a point will be rounded to the next higher grade point. For example, a final average of 79.5 would be rounded to a grade of 80. However, a grade of 79.4 would remain a grade of 79. Final grades are not open to negotiation or extra points for other assignments. Changes will be made only if a clerical error is found.

Late Work:

Assignments are due at the beginning of the class.  Assignments that are submitted after the deadline will be accepted, but only if submitted within 3 days of the original due date.  All late assignments so accepted will receive a 25% reduction late penalty for every 24 hours past the due date.

 

HPU Academic Honesty Policy:

It is assumed that all students are familiar with the University policies regarding academic honesty.  Plagiarism, cheating on examinations or assignments, and taking credit for work that is not your own are serious infractions that will result, at minimum, in a “0” for the involved assignment, and at maximum, in a letter grade of “F” for the course.  If you ever have questions or concerns about plagiarism or academic dishonesty, please see me during my office hours.  I will be happy to assist you in following the standards of ethical academic conduct.  Click on the link below for HPU’s academic honesty policy.

http://www.hpu.edu/OAA/OAA_DOCUMENTS.html

 

ADA Accommodations:

Under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Tile III (Public Accommodations) and Title V (Employment) and the Hawaii Fair Employment Practice Law, Hawaii Pacific University does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities.  Hawaii Pacific University will make reasonable accommodations in its policies, practices, and procedures in order to: (1) allow students with disabilities to benefit from the services and facilities offered by the University, and (2) employ otherwise qualified individuals with disabilities who are able to do the essential tasks of the specific jobs.  HPU will accommodate known disabilities, unless to do so would impose an undue hardship.  This is interpreted to mean significant difficulty (fundamentally altering the nature of the services and facilities provided by the University) or expense.  HPU has a designated ADA Coordinator/Academic Advisor, Danielle DeMello, who is located at the downtown campus, 1164 Bishop St. (UB), Suite 123.  She can be reached by calling (808) 566-2406 or at ddemello@hpu.edu.  If you are a student with special needs, as addressed by the Americans with Disabilities Act, and need any course materials provided in an alternative format, please contact Danielle DeMello and notify your instructor immediately.  If you are unable to reach Danielle DeMello, you can contact the ADA and Academic Advising Assistant at the same address and phone number.  Reasonable efforts will be made to accommodate your special needs.

 

Additional Expectations:

Students are expected to attend every class and turn work in on time.  Students are expected to inform the instructor, in advance, if s/he will not be able to attend class for any reason, in which case students will be expected to make up any work/activities associated with the missed class.  As this is a graduate course, students are expected to participate as professionals in the field, providing opinions and asking questions, coming to class fully prepared, and staying for the duration of the class (unless prior arrangements have been made).  Class participation is worth ¼ of the overall grade and is therefore of critical importance for this class.

 

Additional Considerations:

Students having personal difficulties and wanting independent support/counsel are encouraged to contact Dr. Kevin Bowman of the HPU Counseling Center.  The Counseling and Behavioral Health Center provides free and confidential counseling services to HPU students.  For more information or to make an appointment, click on this link – http://www.hpu.edu/Counseling_Behavioral_Health/ – or call 687-7076.


Course Outline:The following is a TENTATIVE outline of the classes and topics.It is highly unlikely that we will stick to this schedule precisely, but I will do my best.

 

Week

                                           Topic

Required Readings

1/20-1

No Class – MLKJr. Day Chorpita et. al, 2011

1/27-2

Overview; diagnosing children; DSM-5 MB – Ch. 1; DSM-5 Section 1

2/3-3

ADHD MB – Ch. 2; DSM-5

2/10-4

Conduct Problems MB – Ch. 3; DSM-5

2/17-5

Fears and Anxieties MB – Ch. 4; DSM-5

2/24-6

Childhood Depression MB – Ch. 5; DSM-5

3/3-7

Intellectual Disability; Learning Disability MB – Ch. 6 & 8; DSM-5

3/10-8*

Mid Term Exam  

3/17-9

Autism Spectrum Disorder MB – Ch. 7; DSM-5

3/24

No Class – Spring Break

3/31-10+

Child Abuse and Neglect MB – Ch. 9 & 10

4/7-11

Substance Use MB – Ch. 11; DSM-5

4/14-12

Eating Disorders MB – Ch. 12; DSM-5

4/21-13

Catching up – Student Presentations  

4/28-14 : )

Student Presentations – Final Review  

5/5-15

Final Exam  

Dates to remember:

March 1 – Paper topic approval

*March 10 – Mid term examination

+March 31 – Outline for paper/presentation due, in class or via email.

: ) April 28 – Final paper due before midnight

 

Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now