Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now

COURSE PROJECT OVERVIEW Table of Contents Determine the Euro’s Potential Movements in the Next Year Objective Applying the Euro As a financial analyst, you are asked to advise a MNC about its one-year investment plan next year in Germany. Because the investment is denominated in euros, you are asked to forecast how the euro’s value may change against the U.S. dollar over the 1-year period. For your assessment, use all of the three major forecasting techniques. • Fundamental forecasting • Technical forecasting • Market-based forecasting Note: Students will be assigned to teams. Each team should be responsible to assess the next year move of a major currency against the U.S. dollar as noted below, applying the scenario you just read. • Euro against U.S. dollar: Team A • British pound against U.S. dollar: Team B • Japanese yen against U.S. dollar: Team C • Canadian dollar against U.S. dollar: Team D • Australian dollar against U.S. dollar: Team E Guidelines • Papers must be 10–15 pages in length, written in 12-point, double-spaced font, and include a cover page, table of contents, introduction, body of the report, summary or conclusion, and works cited. • Even though this is not a scientific-type writing assignment and is mostly creative in nature, references are still very important. At least six authoritative, outside references are required (anonymous authors or web pages are not acceptable). These should be listed on the last page, titled “Works Cited.” • Appropriate citations are required. • All DeVry University policies are in effect, including the plagiarism policy. • The paper is due during Week 7 of this course. • Any questions about this paper may be discussed in the Course Q & A Forum in the Introduction and Resources module. • This paper is worth 140 total points and will be graded on quality of research topic, quality of paper information, use of citations, grammar, and sentence structure. Milestones Week 1: Take note of your assigned group. Week 2: Select one of the course project’s topic. Weeks 3 and 4: Research and gather data. Week 5: Submit your first draft. Week 6: Revise your first draft. Week 7: Submit your final version of your paper (including to Turnitin.com). Grading Rubrics Category Points % Description First Draft 20 14 This draft is due in Week 5; it should include all sections described in the guidelines. Course Project: Final Paper Documentation and Formatting 18 13 Your paper should follow APA guidelines and format, with a minimum of six research references. Organization and Cohesiveness 28 20 Your paper is well organized using headings, subheadings, and paragraph structure. Editing 18 13 Your paper demonstrates graduate-level writing, including proper grammar, spelling, punctuation, and good sentence structure. Content 56 40 Your paper includes all required sections with clarity of thinking and application of basic principles and tools presented in the course. Final Paper Total 120 – A quality paper will meet or exceed all of the above requirements. Total 140 100 Best Practices The following are best practices in preparing this paper. • Cover Page: Include who you prepared the paper for, who prepared it, and the date. • Table of Contents: List the main ideas and sections of the paper and the pages where they are located. Illustrations should be included separately. • Introduction: Use a header on your paper. This will indicate that you are introducing the paper. The purpose of an introduction or opening is to 1. introduce the subject and why it is important; 2. preview the main ideas and the order in which they will be covered; and 3. establish the tone of the document. Include in the introduction a reason for the audience to read the paper. Also, include an overview of what you will cover and the importance of the material. (This should include or introduce the questions you are asked to answer in each assignment.) • Body of the Report: Use a header with the name of the project. Example: “The Euro’s Potential Movements Against the U.S. Dollar in the Next Year.” Proceed to break out the main ideas: State the main ideas and the major points of each idea, and provide evidence. Show some type of division, such as separate, labeled sections; separate groups of paragraphs; or headers. Include the information you found during your research and investigation. • Summary and Conclusion: Summarizing is similar to paraphrasing but presents the gist of the material in fewer words than the original. An effective summary identifies the main ideas and the major support points from the body of the report; minor details are left out. Summarize the benefits of the ideas and how they affect the subject. • Work Cited: Use the citation format specified in the Syllabus. Additional hints on preparing the best possible project follow. 1. Apply a three-step process to writing: plan, write, and complete. 2. Prepare an outline of the research paper before going forward. 3. Complete a first draft, and then go back to edit, evaluate, and make any changes required. 4. Use visual communication to further clarify and support the written part of the report. Examples include graphs, diagrams, photographs, flowcharts, maps, drawings, animation, video clips, pictograms, tables, and Gantt charts. Group Project and Teamwork The Course Project is based on teamwork. Connecting with your team and identifying a project topic from the above-mentioned list is the first step in completing your Course Project successfully. Please complete the following items upon entry to the course. 1. Create a team charter. After joining a team, download the team charter form, and work with your team to fill it in. This will require a team meeting to ensure everyone is on board with it and accepts and agrees to it. The team charter must be submitted by the end of the first week. 2. As a team, pick a project topic from the list. Submit it with your team charter to your professor for final approval or ideas. 3. Turn in peer reviews. Be sure to turn in your peer review with your project. Download the peer review form in the Files section of the Course Menu, fill it out, and submit it. Failing to turn in a peer review will mean that student receives a 0 for his or her participation score. Your professor has the right to give out different grades. In rare instances, a student chooses not to actively contribute to the team effort. If it is determined that this has happened, the grade for this individual may be lowered by the professor. Your professor will encourage your participation, but note that you will ultimately be responsible for initiating contact with your team members and creating and facilitating your team efforts for completing your course project. 4. Treat everyone with respect. Everyone in the course is busy . . . everyone is working hard and has other life issues occurring. Know that if you miss team meetings and deadlines, your grade will be impacted. Team Formation Successful teams hinge on three important things; good communication, a united focus and goal, and work ethic and common availability. For a team to succeed in this course, the members must communicate with each other often and well; they must unite early on the focus (select a project topic) and team goals (complete a successful plan and present it). Select a topic that works well with your team’s strengths! Utilize your strengths, and be cognizant of your weaknesses. Please note that this course requires that everyone works together and works efficiently. If procrastination is one of your key weaknesses, please address this by adhering firmly to your assigned tasks and deadlines. Let your team members know this is one of your weaknesses up front, and sign up for task-oriented roles for which your leader can keep track of your delivery times. Do not let due dates pass you by, or you will let your team and yourself down. Successful teams rely on meeting deliverable due dates. Team Communications Your team should use multiple methods of communicating with the understanding that regular daily and weekly communication is key to your team’s success! Here are some ideas for methods of communication. • Have weekly face-to-face meetings in addition to class (for onsite courses). Online discussions may take place in the discussion area. • Use your team discussion area on a regular basis to asynchronously keep each team member up-to-date on deliverables, due dates, and draft completion. Your faculty member will not post here unless he or she has something important to provide to you. However, this area will allow for a controlled and archived method of communication that will be more efficient and reliable than e-mails. • Emailing the team is also a valuable team communication method. Please make sure your e-mail address in your course profile is correct! Update your e-mail if it is not correct. • Post drafts, research, survey information, and so forth in the team area in the Files section of the Course Menu for others in your team to see, or you may attach select files in the team discussion area. • Call or e-mail your professor. If you have a question about your plan, check your professor’s office hours in the Syllabus and call or e-mail him or her! PreviousNext

COURSE PROJECT OVERVIEW

Table of Contents

Determine the Euro’s Potential Movements in the Next Year

Objective

Applying the Euro As a financial analyst, you are asked to advise a MNC about its one-year investment plan next year in Germany. Because the investment is denominated in euros, you are asked to forecast how the euro’s value may change against the U.S. dollar over the 1-year period. For your assessment, use all of the three major forecasting techniques.

  • Fundamental forecasting
  • Technical forecasting
  • Market-based forecasting

Note: Students will be assigned to teams. Each team should be responsible to assess the next year move of a major currency against the U.S. dollar as noted below, applying the scenario you just read.

  • Euro against U.S. dollar: Team A
  • British pound against U.S. dollar: Team B
  • Japanese yen against U.S. dollar: Team C
  • Canadian dollar against U.S. dollar: Team D
  • Australian dollar against U.S. dollar: Team E

Guidelines

  • Papers must be 10–15 pages in length, written in 12-point, double-spaced font, and include a cover page, table of contents, introduction, body of the report, summary or conclusion, and works cited.
  • Even though this is not a scientific-type writing assignment and is mostly creative in nature, references are still very important. At least six authoritative, outside references are required (anonymous authors or web pages are not acceptable). These should be listed on the last page, titled “Works Cited.”
  • Appropriate citations are required.
  • All DeVry University policies are in effect, including the plagiarism policy.
  • The paper is due during Week 7 of this course.
  • Any questions about this paper may be discussed in the Course Q & A Forum in the Introduction and Resources module.
  • This paper is worth 140 total points and will be graded on quality of research topic, quality of paper information, use of citations, grammar, and sentence structure.

Milestones

Week 1: Take note of your assigned group.

Week 2: Select one of the course project’s topic.

Weeks 3 and 4: Research and gather data.

Week 5: Submit your first draft.

Week 6: Revise your first draft.

Week 7: Submit your final version of your paper (including to Turnitin.com).

Grading Rubrics

Category Points % Description
First Draft 20 14 This draft is due in Week 5; it should include all sections described in the guidelines.
Course Project: Final Paper
Documentation and Formatting 18 13 Your paper should follow APA guidelines and format, with a minimum of six research references.
Organization and Cohesiveness 28 20 Your paper is well organized using headings, subheadings, and paragraph structure.
Editing 18 13 Your paper demonstrates graduate-level writing, including proper grammar, spelling, punctuation, and good sentence structure.
Content 56 40 Your paper includes all required sections with clarity of thinking and application of basic principles and tools presented in the course.
Final Paper Total 120 A quality paper will meet or exceed all of the above requirements.
Total 140 100  

Best Practices

The following are best practices in preparing this paper.

  • Cover Page: Include who you prepared the paper for, who prepared it, and the date.
  • Table of Contents: List the main ideas and sections of the paper and the pages where they are located. Illustrations should be included separately.
  • Introduction: Use a header on your paper. This will indicate that you are introducing the paper.

The purpose of an introduction or opening is to

  1. introduce the subject and why it is important;
  2. preview the main ideas and the order in which they will be covered; and
  3. establish the tone of the document.

Include in the introduction a reason for the audience to read the paper. Also, include an overview of what you will cover and the importance of the material. (This should include or introduce the questions you are asked to answer in each assignment.)

  • Body of the Report: Use a header with the name of the project. Example: “The Euro’s Potential Movements Against the U.S. Dollar in the Next Year.” Proceed to break out the main ideas: State the main ideas and the major points of each idea, and provide evidence. Show some type of division, such as separate, labeled sections; separate groups of paragraphs; or headers. Include the information you found during your research and investigation.
  • Summary and Conclusion: Summarizing is similar to paraphrasing but presents the gist of the material in fewer words than the original. An effective summary identifies the main ideas and the major support points from the body of the report; minor details are left out. Summarize the benefits of the ideas and how they affect the subject.
  • Work Cited: Use the citation format specified in the Syllabus.

Additional hints on preparing the best possible project follow.

  1. Apply a three-step process to writing: plan, write, and complete.
  2. Prepare an outline of the research paper before going forward.
  3. Complete a first draft, and then go back to edit, evaluate, and make any changes required.
  4. Use visual communication to further clarify and support the written part of the report. Examples include graphs, diagrams, photographs, flowcharts, maps, drawings, animation, video clips, pictograms, tables, and Gantt charts.

Group Project and Teamwork

The Course Project is based on teamwork. Connecting with your team and identifying a project topic from the above-mentioned list is the first step in completing your Course Project successfully. Please complete the following items upon entry to the course.

  1. Create a team charter. After joining a team, download the team charter form, and work with your team to fill it in. This will require a team meeting to ensure everyone is on board with it and accepts and agrees to it. The team charter must be submitted by the end of the first week.
  2. As a team, pick a project topic from the list. Submit it with your team charter to your professor for final approval or ideas.
  3. Turn in peer reviews. Be sure to turn in your peer review with your project. Download the peer review form in the Files section of the Course Menu, fill it out, and submit it. Failing to turn in a peer review will mean that student receives a 0 for his or her participation score. Your professor has the right to give out different grades. In rare instances, a student chooses not to actively contribute to the team effort. If it is determined that this has happened, the grade for this individual may be lowered by the professor. Your professor will encourage your participation, but note that you will ultimately be responsible for initiating contact with your team members and creating and facilitating your team efforts for completing your course project.
  4. Treat everyone with respect. Everyone in the course is busy . . . everyone is working hard and has other life issues occurring. Know that if you miss team meetings and deadlines, your grade will be impacted.

Team Formation

Successful teams hinge on three important things; good communication, a united focus and goal, and work ethic and common availability.

For a team to succeed in this course, the members must communicate with each other often and well; they must unite early on the focus (select a project topic) and team goals (complete a successful plan and present it).

Select a topic that works well with your team’s strengths! Utilize your strengths, and be cognizant of your weaknesses.

Please note that this course requires that everyone works together and works efficiently. If procrastination is one of your key weaknesses, please address this by adhering firmly to your assigned tasks and deadlines. Let your team members know this is one of your weaknesses up front, and sign up for task-oriented roles for which your leader can keep track of your delivery times. Do not let due dates pass you by, or you will let your team and yourself down. Successful teams rely on meeting deliverable due dates.

Team Communications

Your team should use multiple methods of communicating with the understanding that regular daily and weekly communication is key to your team’s success! Here are some ideas for methods of communication.

  • Have weekly face-to-face meetings in addition to class (for onsite courses). Online discussions may take place in the discussion area.
  • Use your team discussion areaon a regular basis to asynchronously keep each team member up-to-date on deliverables, due dates, and draft completion. Your faculty member will not post here unless he or she has something important to provide to you. However, this area will allow for a controlled and archived method of communication that will be more efficient and reliable than e-mails.
  • Emailing the team is also a valuable team communication method. Please make sure your e-mail address in your course profile is correct! Update your e-mail if it is not correct.
  • Post drafts, research, survey information, and so forth in the team area in the Files section of the Course Menu for others in your team to see, or you may attach select files in the team discussion area.
  • Call or e-mail your professor. If you have a question about your plan, check your professor’s office hours in the Syllabus and call or e-mail him or her!

PreviousNext

 

Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now